Mastering Lapwing conservation

wadertales

Predation and perceived risk of predation in Lapwings

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Students from the University of East Angliaand conservation organisations such as the RSPB Centre for Conservation Science benefit greatly from applied conservation research by MSc students. Two recent papers, reporting on projects by Sam Leigh and Nik Bertholdt, focus on risks and perceived risks to nesting Lapwings.

Lapwings – a diminishing asset

Blog adultLowland, breeding waders are increasingly confined to nature reserves, and the wet grasslands of the Norfolk Broads retain some of the largest remaining populations of Lapwing and Redshank in England. Over the last two decades, a collaboration between Dr Jennifer Smart of RSPB and Professor Jennifer Gill the University of East Anglia (UEA) has helped to identify some of the key habitat management options that can attract breeding waders. A series of dissertation projects by nine students on the Masters in Applied Ecology and Conservation course at UEA have…

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