Indian court upholds ban on sale of diclofenac – BirdGuides

https://www.birdguides.com/news/indian-court-upholds-ban-on-sale-of-diclofenac/

Interpreting changing wader counts

wadertales

Blog mixed flockWhen you count the number of Redshank on your local estuary and discover that there are fewer now than there were last year –  or five, or twenty years ago – what are the implications? Is this part of a national or international trend or has something changed within the estuary itself?

The first question to ask is, ‘what is happening elsewhere?’ and then to wonder about the ways in which numbers of birds in different sites might relate to each other. What actually happens to local counts when national counts go down – or go up, for that matter?

The UK Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) data provide comprehensive and long-term monitoring of estuarine wader populations around our coastline. Thanks to volunteers who collect monthly counts each year, these data present an excellent opportunity to explore how bird distributions can change over time. A new paper by Verónica Méndez and…

View original post 1,180 more words

Wetland Bird Survey: working for waders

wadertales

Red-listed Curlews, Scottish Oystercatchers, a boom in Black-tailed Godwits and the need for safe roost sites. Here’s a selection of WaderTales blogs that may appeal to counters who contribute to the UK Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) and other birdwatchers who like waders/shorebirds.

Blog RINGOS

It’s 70 years since UK birdwatchers started to count waders and waterfowl and there are now over 3000 registered Wetland Bird Survey volunteers.

WeBS70logo6a_smallThe work that volunteers do to chart the rises and falls of species as diverse as Redshanks and Whooper Swans provides a unique insight into the fortunes of our wintering waterbirds. As a tribute to the people behind the binoculars and telescopes, I highlight seven WaderTales articles that use WeBS data. Click on the links in bold if you want to read a particular story.

Curlew counts

curlew WeBS counts for Curlew in Great Britain between 1974 and 2016

In the blog Is the Curlew…

View original post 1,111 more words

A place to roost

wadertales

Safe roost sites are important for waders such as Black-tailed Godwits

top-picIt has been said that Black-tailed Godwits are the laziest birds in the world, usually in a frustrated tone while waiting for a marked bird to wake up and reveal the rest of its colour rings. Roosting is not laziness, however; it’s an important resource conservation strategy in the daily balance of energy inputs and outputs.

When Black-tailed Godwits are feeding in tidal systems they have a limited amount of time each day to access the shellfish and worms that make up their diet. These foods are unavailable over the high-tide period, and sometimes in the lull between the ebb and flood, so birds conserve energy by gathering together at roosts. They seek out sites which are safe and sheltered and go to sleep – often for several hours if undisturbed. Theunis Piersma and colleagues have shown that sleep…

View original post 1,376 more words

Establishing breeding requirements of Whimbrel

wadertales

Breeding Whimbrel may be associated with wet heaths but chicks need small pools and ditches too

header

One of the advantages for waders (shorebirds) is that parents can lead their chicks to suitable feeding areas almost as soon as they are hatched. This means that the habitat in which parents choose to secrete their nests can be very different to the habitat in which their youngsters will later forage.

ad-for-blogAs part of a study into the potential impacts of a large wind farm proposal on Shetland, a team from Alba Ecology Ltd and Natural Research Projects Ltd collected data on the habitat associations of wader species, particularly Whimbrel, on Mainland Shetland. A paper in the BTO journal Bird Study shows that habitats used by Whimbrel chicks for feeding are significantly different to those used by adults for feeding and nesting.

Habitat characteristics of breeding Eurasian Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus on Mainland Shetland…

View original post 823 more words

Bar-tailed Godwits: migration & survival

wadertales

Putting the flags out –  to learn more about one of the most amazing species of migrating wader.

Ruth banner

When we caught 505 Bar-tailed Godwits on the Wash, on the east coast of England, on 29 August 1976 we thought that we would add hugely to our knowledge of the species’ migration but we were disappointed. In the last six years, by adding leg-flags to just 248 birds, the Wash Wader Ringing Group has learnt a lot more.

Forty years ago

On 29 August 1976, in the days of stubble-burning, we had covered four cannon nets with fine, black burnt chaff to hide them almost completely. We knew that the big tide would push birds off the saltings and over the sea wall, there were decoys to pull the birds into the right 1% of a vast, flat field and the weather was good. Everything was ready. I was in a…

View original post 1,520 more words