Interpreting changing wader counts

Originally posted on wadertales:
When you count the number of Redshank on your local estuary and discover that there are fewer now than there were last year –  or five, or twenty years ago – what are the implications? Is this part of a national or international trend or has something changed within the estuary itself? The first question to ask is, ‘what is happening… Continue reading Interpreting changing wader counts

Wetland Bird Survey: working for waders

Originally posted on wadertales:
Red-listed Curlews, Scottish Oystercatchers, a boom in Black-tailed Godwits and the need for safe roost sites. Here’s a selection of WaderTales blogs that may appeal to counters who contribute to the UK Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) and other birdwatchers who like waders/shorebirds. It’s 70 years since UK birdwatchers started to count waders and waterfowl and there are now over 3000 registered… Continue reading Wetland Bird Survey: working for waders

A place to roost

Originally posted on wadertales:
Safe roost sites are important for waders such as Black-tailed Godwits It has been said that Black-tailed Godwits are the laziest birds in the world, usually in a frustrated tone while waiting for a marked bird to wake up and reveal the rest of its colour rings. Roosting is not laziness, however; it’s an important resource conservation strategy in the daily… Continue reading A place to roost

Establishing breeding requirements of Whimbrel

Originally posted on wadertales:
Breeding Whimbrel may be associated with wet heaths but chicks need small pools and ditches too One of the advantages for waders (shorebirds) is that parents can lead their chicks to suitable feeding areas almost as soon as they are hatched. This means that the habitat in which parents choose to secrete their nests can be very different to the habitat… Continue reading Establishing breeding requirements of Whimbrel

Bar-tailed Godwits: migration & survival

Originally posted on wadertales:
Putting the flags out –  to learn more about one of the most amazing species of migrating wader. When we caught 505 Bar-tailed Godwits on the Wash, on the east coast of England, on 29 August 1976 we thought that we would add hugely to our knowledge of the species’ migration but we were disappointed. In the last six years, by… Continue reading Bar-tailed Godwits: migration & survival