Curlews can’t wait for a treatment plan

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Europe is losing 5000 Curlews every year. What can we all do to stop – or even slow down the decline?

RC single bird muddy edgeIf a patient presents with a problem, it’s the job of the health professional to work out the root cause, to come up with a treatment plan and to check that it works. That’s the process that is used for bird conservation – notice, diagnose, treat and monitor. Sometimes, however, the patient is in such a serious condition that you cannot wait for a full set of test results, you just have to try something. That’s the situation with Curlew in the United Kingdom; the losses are so rapid that people are already taking local action to try to increase chick numbers (see some links at the bottom).

This blog focuses on a new paper, by Samantha Franks and colleagues from the BTO and RSPB, that…

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A great summer for Iceland’s waders?

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As July 2017 turned into August, the first juvenile Icelandic Black-tailed Godwits started to arrive in the UK – soon they were everywhere. Had this been a good year for waders and wader research in Iceland?

juvvy blackwits Flock of juvenile Black-tailed Godwits in Devon

An increasing amount of wader research is taking place in Iceland, much of which is part of an international partnership between the South Iceland Research Centre (University of Iceland), the University of East Anglia (UK) and the University of Aveiro (Portugal). Although the main focus has been on Black-tailed Godwits, Whimbrels and Oystercatchers, there is a lot more to this collaboration.

Winter into spring

january surveyThe spring season started early for Verónica Méndez, who is studying the migratory decisions made by Iceland’s Oystercatchers. About one third of these birds stay in Iceland for the winter but most are thought to migrate to Ireland and western coasts of the…

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Mastering Lapwing conservation

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Predation and perceived risk of predation in Lapwings

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Students from the University of East Angliaand conservation organisations such as the RSPB Centre for Conservation Science benefit greatly from applied conservation research by MSc students. Two recent papers, reporting on projects by Sam Leigh and Nik Bertholdt, focus on risks and perceived risks to nesting Lapwings.

Lapwings – a diminishing asset

Blog adultLowland, breeding waders are increasingly confined to nature reserves, and the wet grasslands of the Norfolk Broads retain some of the largest remaining populations of Lapwing and Redshank in England. Over the last two decades, a collaboration between Dr Jennifer Smart of RSPB and Professor Jennifer Gill the University of East Anglia (UEA) has helped to identify some of the key habitat management options that can attract breeding waders. A series of dissertation projects by nine students on the Masters in Applied Ecology and Conservation course at UEA have…

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Wader declines in the shrinking Yellow Sea

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An important paper by Colin Studds and colleagues shines a spotlight on the Yellow Sea, where waders/shorebirds have lost vast areas of feeding habitat during China’s economic boom.

headerWaders make some of the most remarkable migratory journeys in the bird world and many rely on a few key estuaries to refuel, especially as they head north to breed. For hundreds of thousands of waders on the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, from tiny Red-necked Stints to Far Eastern Curlews, the Yellow Sea is absolutely crucial. A new paper by Colin Studds and sixteen colleagues collates the available information on current population trends of waders using this flyway and shows how these relate to the reliance of each species on the Yellow Sea. The more a species relies on disappearing mudflats, between China and the Korean peninsular, the faster it is declining.

As Colin Studds says: “Scientists have long believed that loss of…

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