Winter Ruddy Ducks on the Hudson River

Originally posted on incidental naturalist:
The fierce wind sliced through my jacket as I stepped outside the door of my apartment building. Winter had wrapped its cloak around the North East of the United States. I had arrived in the country in the steamy heat of August, but now, in December, the mercury was in free-fall. My morning commute took me along the edge of… Continue reading Winter Ruddy Ducks on the Hudson River

Sydney Swans – Also Available in Black

Originally posted on incidental naturalist:
All swans are white, right? Majestic snow-white angels of the lake. Wrong! It was during a 1980s summer holiday to a small English seaside town that I discovered the mute swan’s alter ego; the Black Swan. The English town of Dawlish sits on the south coast of the county of Devon. It has been symbolised by the Black swan since 1906,… Continue reading Sydney Swans – Also Available in Black

Where to see a Woodcock in Manhattan

Originally posted on incidental naturalist:
Monolithic skyscrapers burst from every inch of land on New York’s iconic Manhattan island. They stand like great tombstones for the nature that once survived on an island that grew fat on the Hudson Valley fur trapping economy. This is no longer a place for nature, and certainly not a place for incidental wildlife encounters. Or is it? High-rise buildings… Continue reading Where to see a Woodcock in Manhattan

Chris xepapas on Instagram: “Podocarpus lawrencei #bonsai , #Tasmanian #native plum pine. Second round of refinement using copper wire, which will be left on the tree…”

View this post on Instagram Podocarpus lawrencei #bonsai , #Tasmanian #native plum pine. Second round of refinement using copper wire, which will be left on the tree for 2 to 3 years. A couple of nice jins to add to the trees effect of being battered around on some rocky out crop high in the Tasmanian highlands. A post shared by Chris xepapas (@heritage_bonsai) on … Continue reading Chris xepapas on Instagram: “Podocarpus lawrencei #bonsai , #Tasmanian #native plum pine. Second round of refinement using copper wire, which will be left on the tree…”