The Melody of Warbler Road – the Hooded Warbler

Originally posted on Birds and Blooms:
? Take a stroll down the “Warbler Road” of south-central Pennsylvania’s Michaux State Forest, and listen to a melody  and perhaps even observe one of its most prolific breeding songbirds, the Hooded Warbler … Hooded Warbler male in song… ou may be disappointed if you do a Google search for a “Warbler Road” in Pennsylvania as it “doesn’t exist”. … Continue reading The Melody of Warbler Road – the Hooded Warbler

“Water Walkers” A Collection of Favorites from our Coastal Plains

Originally posted on Birds and Blooms:
Tri-colored Heron,  San Bernard National Wildlife Refuge, Brazoria County,  Matagorda County,  Texas ? midst a mixture of old and new,  I decided to put together a collection of some of my favorite “Wading” birds from my archives over the years and present them here in my Blog.    These were captured from various locations,   from the Gulf Coast of… Continue reading “Water Walkers” A Collection of Favorites from our Coastal Plains

Just Passing Through,….. the Palm Warbler

Originally posted on Birds and Blooms:
Palm Warbler, Yellow (Spring)  Setophaga palmarum. hypochrysea Kowomu Trail,  Carroll County,  Maryland Like the Magnolia Warbler,  the Palm Warbler’s name has very little to do with its preferred habitat.   The Palm Warbler was named by Johann Friedrich Gmelin,  a German naturalist, botanist, entomologist, herpetologist,  and malacologist based on a specimen collected on Hispaniola,  a Caribbean island with a lot… Continue reading Just Passing Through,….. the Palm Warbler

AT PRESENT, A SUDDEN ABSENCE

Originally posted on Towheeblog:
Some disappointments are inevitable.  Some time you will taste your last fresh cherry of the summer.  Some morning in winter you will wake up…BEFORE sunrise.  Some time soon the finest dogwood in your neighborhood will drop its last leaf of the year.  Today I woke to find the bird feeders busy.  I replenished the sunflower seed supply. The suet log was… Continue reading AT PRESENT, A SUDDEN ABSENCE

BIG VOICE…YOU THINK THOSE CANADA GEESE ARE LOUD?

Originally posted on Towheeblog:
Lemme tell you about loud.  Sonic science tells us the loudest bird is a bellbird. And you wonder why so many urban gulls look fat?  They are junk food junkies.  They can look like those overweight customers driving electric carts around big box stores, filling the basket with high-sugar and greasy contents. Continue reading BIG VOICE…YOU THINK THOSE CANADA GEESE ARE LOUD?

THE LATEST IN MIGRATION TRACKING IN NORTH AMERICA

Originally posted on Towheeblog:
Ornithologists are now collecting a wealth of details about our continent’s migratory birds.  If our species can muster the political will this knowledge will help in selection of habitats to protect, high-rises to turn dark, wind mills to turn off and numerous other issues that people seem to consistently fail to agree on. Much of the latest data is coming from… Continue reading THE LATEST IN MIGRATION TRACKING IN NORTH AMERICA

HERE’S A RIPE MANGO FOR YOU

Originally posted on Towheeblog:
These are photos of a Green-breasted Mango, to be precise.  All photos by Wayne Easley, taken at Rancho Naturalista, Costa Rica: Here is Wayne’s commentary on this gorgeous species: “The Green-breasted Mangos are fairly large hummingbirds that have lots of bells and whistles.  They are one of the more common species that frequents the gardens of Rancho Naturalista, a birding lodge… Continue reading HERE’S A RIPE MANGO FOR YOU

Raptor Wednesday

Originally posted on Backyard and Beyond:
Merlins above Green-Wood. Two sightings on one day well separated in space: one or two birds? The lush meadow rising above the chapel has attracted sparrows and warblers, which means the bird-hunting falcons, too. Bother Merlins and American Kestrels having been perching on this scaffolding and on surrounding trees. Not at the same time: they will chase each off.… Continue reading Raptor Wednesday