Can habitat management rescue Lapwing populations?

wadertales

Can a mosaic of habitats boost hatching success in grassland-breeding Lapwings?

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Lapwings are becoming more and more restricted in their distribution within the United Kingdom, with an increasing proportion dependent on a small number of lowland wet grassland sites, particularly nature reserves. Working in this habitat, a team from the RSPB and the University of East Anglia has been trying to work out if it is possible to substantially improve Lapwing productivity without using intensive, costly predator management, in the form of permanent electric fences.

Background

graphThe RSPB has been monitoring breeding waders on their Berney Marshes reserve in Norfolk for over 20 years. Even with fox control, a wader-friendly grazing regime and sensitive regulation of water levels, Lapwing nesting success on this site is still below 0.6-0.8 chicks per pairs in most years, which is the estimated range required for population stability (Macdonald & Bolton 2008a). Predation is the main issue that…

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