Bird’s ID – Great Grebe

Originally posted on H.J. Ruiz – Avian101:
Great Grebe The Great Grebe (Podiceps major) is the largest species of grebe in the world. A disjunct population exists in northwestern Peru, while the main distribution is from extreme southeastern Brazil to Patagonia and central Chile. This is a very large grebe, with proportions more like a goose or a cormorant then a typical grebe. They… Continue reading Bird’s ID – Great Grebe

Bird’s ID – Black Vulture

Originally posted on H.J. Ruiz – Avian101:
Black Vulture The Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus), also known as the American black vulture, is a bird in the New World vulture family whose range extends from the southeastern United States to Central Chile and Uruguay in South America. Although a common and widespread species, it has a somewhat more restricted distribution than its compatriot, the turkey… Continue reading Bird’s ID – Black Vulture

Another unusual sighting: Cinnamon Becard at 1300 m in San Antonio de Santa Cruz

Originally posted on Birds for Beer:
After the excitement of finding two species new to my house list this week, yet another appeared yesterday. The Cinnamon Becard (Pachyramphus cinnamomeus) is a common bird in the Caribbean lowlands but my garden, where a pair appeared yesterday morning, is at 1288 m elevation in San Antonio de Santa Cruz, Turrialba, well above this bird’s normal range. I… Continue reading Another unusual sighting: Cinnamon Becard at 1300 m in San Antonio de Santa Cruz

New species in my garden

Originally posted on Birds for Beer:
After a too lengthy absence from Turrialba I returned this week to note two species that I have previously not found here. Actually it’s no great shock since neither species is rare, but the first, early in the morning, was a Barred Antshrike (Thamnophilus doliatus), a species that is not often found at these elevations. Male Barred Antshrike with… Continue reading New species in my garden

Elaenias around Turrialba

Originally posted on Birds for Beer:
Elaenias are medium-sized flycatchers found only in the Americas, and then only from Mexico southwards. The name means ‘of olive oil’ and refers to the general colour of their plumage. Identification of many of the 21 species can be difficult, but in the Turrialba area only two of the four species that occur in Costa Rica are really common,… Continue reading Elaenias around Turrialba