Raptor Wednesday

Backyard and Beyond

Brooklyn’s airspace can be crowded. On Raven Day, the subject of my last two posts, I watched a Red-tail Hawk and Common Raven chase each other. Another Red-tail joined the fray, but didn’t stay long. Sometimes the R chased the RT, sometimes the RT chased the R.Both birds were quite vocal: hoarse guttural calls from the raven, higher-pitched screeches from the hawk. The Raven really let go with the calls when the hawk was perched.
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Marilynn Robison has an extraordinary essay in the June Harper’s on the necessity, for the wealthy, of poverty. “What really matters here is how people are valued; they are not valued sufficiently to sustain democracy.”

Speaking of democracy, there will be a rally for biodiversity at NYC City Hall this morning at 10. Organizers want the City Council to pass a resolution in support of a UN biodiversity agreement and to take action…

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More Ravens!

Backyard and Beyond

Books have been written by the intelligence and culture of ravens. It’s extraordinary to be near these largest of the songbirds, listening to their hoarse chatter. They’ve certainly figured out how to live in urban areas. There’s both the wild, in this case duck eggs, and the domestic, in this case chicken eggs from Costco. After the end of the persecution that forced them into remote fastnesses, they’ve re-bounded, and expanded into non-traditional habitat. The first Common Raven nest sighting I know about in NYC was in Queens. On January 1st, 2015, a pair were cavorting down at the end of 39th Street here in Brooklyn (past the fence, it’s all bay until New Jersey), where I was ecstatic to see them.
The Sunset Park/Green-Wood corridor has been a raven runway since. In 2016, I saw a family of five from my windows. Yes, this one broke off…

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Getting Away From Reality

roncorylus

IMG_3530 Looking west

After elections and social unrest, it was a pleasure to be on the mountain once again this morning.  We were at peace with the world and it reflected our enjoyment of our surroundings by providing perfect weather for walking.  There were only seven of us present – those who stayed at home missed a fine outing.

We stopped near White Rock for a snack and were watched by a pair of Cape Rockjumpers, which no doubt wondered what we were doing on their mountain, but they did not trouble us!  A White-necked Raven flew by, but was not interested in coming too close.  For the rest, there were no birds at all and we wondered why.  I had hoped to see Hottentot Buttonquail, Sentinel Rock-Thrush and Ground Woodpecker, but there was no sign of any of them!  We will just have to keep on trying!

Our outing lasted…

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A walk for the birds at Oak Hills

Birds of New England.com

Some bird nerd with cool birdwatching peeps.

I’m a little late with this posting but better late than never. A few Saturdays ago I led a bird walk at Oak Hills Park in Norwalk. I was honored to be invited by the park’s Nature Advisory Committee to be the bird guide. Of course, I accepted because I love spreading the good word about birds and I have a soft spot for any volunteer organization that promotes nature appreciation and saves land.

As a bit of background, Oak Hills Park is mainly a golf course and the nature trails are on land that was once targeted to be cleared for a driving range. The Nature Advisory Committee now stewards that part of the property, which is valuable for birds and other animals — and plants for that matter. Case in point, during the walk we came across a box turtle in…

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A few yard visitors, part I

Birds of New England.com

Photo by Chris Bosak
A rose-breasted grosbeak eats safflower seeds from a feeder in Danbury, Conn., May 2019.

Now that Warbler Week has passed and the spring migration is on a downward trend (but far from over), I’ll take the next few weeks to share photos of some yard visitors I’ve had this spring. As always, feel free to contact me with what birds you’ve been seeing. Send to chrisbosak26@gmail.com. Be sure to include the town and state in which the sighting was made. Thanks!

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