Kagawa BONSAI on Instagram: “I went to look for cypress. ヒノキを探しに行きました。 . Cypress with lovely leaves. . It is a beautiful bonsai. . Today ‘s a journey to find such a…”

https://www.instagram.com/kagawabonsai/p/Bt-yxDjH-0w/ Continue reading Kagawa BONSAI on Instagram: “I went to look for cypress. ヒノキを探しに行きました。 . Cypress with lovely leaves. . It is a beautiful bonsai. . Today ‘s a journey to find such a…”

Bird’s ID – Yellow-rumped Warbler

Originally posted on H.J. Ruiz – Avian101:
Yellow-Romped Warbler The Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) is a North American bird species combining four closely related forms: the eastern myrtle warbler (ssp coronata); its western counterpart, Audubon’s warbler (ssp group auduboni); the northwest Mexican black-fronted warbler (ssp nigrifrons); and the Guatemalan Goldman’s warbler (ssp goldmani). This is a mid-sized New World warbler, though it is one… Continue reading Bird’s ID – Yellow-rumped Warbler

Return of Bird of the Week: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Originally posted on Wickersham's Conscience:
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Brownsville, Texas North America boasts two very long-tailed flycatchers. The first is the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. It’s found in the summer throughout he southcentral United States, and year-round in Mexico and Central America. It’s a bit of bug-eating specialist, targeting mostly grasshoppers and beetles. The male’s tail is longer than the female’s and the colors on the female… Continue reading Return of Bird of the Week: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Return of Bird of the Week: Fork-tailed Flycatcher

Originally posted on Wickersham's Conscience:
Fork-tailed Flycatcher, Oaxaca, Mexico This is a pretty wretched photo; WC includes it only because it’s the best image WC has of this distant cousin to last week’s Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, the Fork-tailed Flycatcher. It’s a vagrant species in the United States, but fairly common in Mexico and Central America, and much of South America. The tail is even longer… Continue reading Return of Bird of the Week: Fork-tailed Flycatcher

ONE OF AMERICA’S GREAT CONSERVATIONISTS HAS DIED

Originally posted on Towheeblog:
Dr. Tom Cade.  Click here for obituary and description of his role in reviving our peregrine population. Breeding endangered species in captivity and releasing them after proper preparation has worked to keep many species alive–California Condor for example. The release part is still not a guaranteed for the Hawaiian Crow (Alala), however.  Click here to read about their current status, with… Continue reading ONE OF AMERICA’S GREAT CONSERVATIONISTS HAS DIED

Visiting The Peregrine Fund’s Back Rooms

Originally posted on Wickersham's Conscience:
Here’s a nearly Christmas present for WC’s loyal readers. The Peregrine Fund has an educational mission and performs it very well. Whether it is environmental hazards for birds or habitat loss or climate change, The Peregrine Fund teaches well, wrapping the message in the spectacular birds it houses. The Free Flight programs have probably educated as many non-birders on… Continue reading Visiting The Peregrine Fund’s Back Rooms

What WC Did On His Vacation: Harpy Eagles

Originally posted on Wickersham's Conscience:
Crikey. WC leaves the internet for a few days and returns to find that Gov. Mike “Sucker Punch” Dunleavy has kicked Alaska and the Alaska economy in the fork. You have to wonder how many times Alaskans will elect a governor from Wasilla before they learn their lesson. It’s too much to deal with right now; let’s talk about… Continue reading What WC Did On His Vacation: Harpy Eagles

Holiday Greenery and Trees  

Originally posted on Acreage Life – Nebraska:
Deciding on an artificial versus real Christmas tree is a matter of personal preference. Growing up, we had an artificial tree mostly because my mom’s allergies were very sensitive to the smell of pines and our house was pretty small so having a small tree we knew would fit in our dining room was preferred. We did however… Continue reading Holiday Greenery and Trees