A helping hand for Lapwings

wadertales

This article has been slightly adapted from one written for the Autumn 2015 edition of The Harrier, published by the Suffolk Ornithologists’ Group

Lapwing in flight: Richard Chandler Lapwing in flight: Richard Chandler

The space-invader cries of displaying Lapwings are welcome signs of spring across much of Britain’s countryside and losses of this iconic species, especially in lowland England, have been well chronicled.  Conservation organisations, and the RSPB in particular, are successfully supporting breeding numbers on nature reserves but how can their interventions be replicated on working farms, without flooding fields and installing fox-proof electric fences?

On the look-out: Grahame Madge/RSPB impages On the look-out: Grahame Madge/RSPB impages

Dr Jen Smart of the RSPB Centre for Conservation Science and Professor Jenny  Gill of the University of East Anglia have been studying breeding waders on  RSPB Reserves in the Norfolk Broads for over ten years, but more recently they have extended their wader research into commercially managed grasslands across Norfolk and…

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