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Great crested flycatcher is a small bird with a very big name

Our Fine Feathered Friends

GREATCrested Photo by Bryan Stevens • A great crested flycatcher perches in the branches of a pine in South Carolina.

Knoxville resident Rebecca Boyd shared on Facebook on May 27 that she enjoyed seeing a new bird at her home. “Although the guide books say this is a common bird, this morning was the first time I’ve ever seen a great crested flycatcher,” she wrote on her post.

I congratulated her and asked if she heard the bird make its loud “wheep” call. Only one bird — the great crested flycatcher — produces that loud, whistled “wheep!” She reported that she did indeed hear the call, which helped her find the bird in a tree in her yard.

Many species of birds have been given puzzling common names, and this is certainly the case for the great crested flycatcher. This bird does indeed sport a raggedy crest. For a flycatcher, it…

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Regional bird count detects population trends

Our Fine Feathered Friends

Driveway-Heron Photo by Pattie Rowland • A Great Blue Heron explores a paved driveway at a home in Erwin, Tennessee. Rookeries, or nesting colonies, in Erwin have expanded the population of this large wading bird locally.

Members of the Elizabethton Bird Club and birding organizations in Kingsport and Bristol fanned out across Northeast Tennessee on Saturday, May 5, for the 75th consecutive Elizabethton Spring Bird Count. A total of 60 observers (a new participation record) looked for birds in Tennessee’s Carter County and parts of the adjacent counties of Johnson, Sullivan, Unicoi and Washington.

Counts like this one, as well as surveys such as the Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas, now in its third season, provide valuable information to assist responsible agencies and organizations with the protection and preservation of the nation’s birds.

This year’s spring count tallied 152 species, slightly better than the overall average of 149 species established over the…

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Mission Impossible? Counting Iceland’s wintering Oystercatchers

wadertales

If Norwegian Oystercatchers migrate south and west for the winter, how is it that thousands of Oystercatchers can adopt a stay-at-home strategy in Iceland, which lies at a higher latitude than most of Norway?

Braving the cold

As part of a project to try to understand why some Oystercatchers spend the winter in Iceland, when most fly south across the Atlantic, researchers needed to count the ones that remain. Unlike in the UK, where the Wetland Bird Survey can rely on over 3000 volunteers to make monthly counts of waders and waterfowl, it’s tough to organise coordinated counts of waders in Iceland. Winter weather, a small pool of birdwatchers and short days don’t help when you are trying to cover the coastline of a country the size of England.

blog wading

Up until 2016, the only winter wader data in Iceland came from Christmas Bird Counts, first run in 1956. These coordinated…

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Site-fidelity in Black-tailed Godwits

wadertales

Shorebirds are generally philopatric (site-faithful to breeding areas) – youngsters settle to breed in areas near where they were raised and adults don’t move far in subsequent years. What happens to this process when a species is expanding its range or if chicks are reared away from their parents?

Successful head-starting

In a recent trial, to see if head-starting might help to secure the future of limosa Black-tailed Godwits in the Washes of Eastern England, one of the questions to be answered was “would youngsters reared in captivity be able to gather all of the information they need to return to the same area to breed?”

blog nestEggs collected from nests on the RSPB’s Nene Washes nature reserve were taken to the WWT’s facilities at Welney, about 35 kilometres away, to be head-started. Here, the eggs were hatched and the chicks were raised in captivity. As they got bigger, the birds…

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Curlew Moon

wadertales

In deference to the scientific papers that underpin them, stories in previous WaderTales blogs are expressed in facts and correlations, not emotions. This blog, which is in part a review of Curlew Moon by Mary Colwell, is a little more personal.

Curlew Moon – a special book

book coverCurlew Moon, is based upon Mary Colwell’s walk from the West of Ireland to the East of England, raising money for the BirdWatch Ireland, BTO, RSPB and GWCT Curlew appeals and researching material for the book. She takes the reader into the stripped-bare peat bogs of central Ireland, shares the excitement of feeling the beating heart of a newly-ringed Curlew and meets some great people who care about Curlews in their own, local patches. The book is a fascinating blend of Curlews, agricultural history, culture and poetry – written beautifully.

Global problems

blog flightCurlews are large waders that live long lives. The family…

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