Cork Oak Progress Update

Originally posted on artsofjc:
Purchased this cork oak from a nursery in southern California in 2009. It was in a standard nursery pot from a bonsai grower. When I got it home I was shocked to see that its roots were mostly 4 plus inches below the soil level with a stick in between with only a few small feeder roods in the nebari. So,… Continue reading Cork Oak Progress Update

Akadama, the ideal Bonsai soil

Originally posted on Adam's Art and Bonsai Blog:
Soil. Dirt. Aggregate. Substrate. Soilless mix. Whatever you call it (the only correct and descriptive phrase is the last one), it’s a controversial subject. One can have a more civil argument discussing the left/right division in the US political paradigm of contemporary society than you can talking about Bonsai mix. Sounds like a good topic for… Continue reading Akadama, the ideal Bonsai soil

Let the tree talk to you, just don’t be surprised if they say they want to leaf……

Originally posted on Adam's Art and Bonsai Blog:
This is a clients tree, chloroluceun tortum, the Brazilian raintree. It’s a humble little tree really. But she likes it. And that’s all that matters. It had a Jin on it, but this is all that’s left of the deadwood. The unfortunate thing about having smaller trees is the impermanence of deadwood features that are intricately… Continue reading Let the tree talk to you, just don’t be surprised if they say they want to leaf……

Greenwood Bonsai Studio’s 40th Anniversary Celebration

Valavanis Bonsai Blog Greenwood Bonsai Studio in Nottingham, England was established in 1978 by Harry Tomlinson. After Harry’s passing his two sons, Corin and Paul are the new proprietors and have developed the garden into the oldest and largest bonsai nursery and teaching studio in England. To celebrate this successful achievement Corin and Paul are hosting two special bonsai events this year. On May 25-28, … Continue reading Greenwood Bonsai Studio’s 40th Anniversary Celebration

Male scarlet tanager stands out from other birds

Originally posted on Our Fine Feathered Friends:
Photo by Jeana Chapman • A male scarlet tanager forages close to the ground, which is not typical behavior for these birds. Tanagers, although brightly colored, spend most of their time in the tree canopy obscured from view. I received an email from Lewis and Jeana Chapman detailing a dazzling discovery they made. The couple have been adding… Continue reading Male scarlet tanager stands out from other birds