Cascade Bonsai Cavalcade

Bonsai & Yamadori from Tony Tickle

I have more than my fair share of cascade and semi cascade bonsai, here is a selection of the smaller ones photographed today including Yew, Communis Juniper and Olive. They are all still in development (maybe the olive is finished) They are super trees to work but difficult to transport to shows, typically I have to make bespoke carriages for them to fit in the truck.

calligrapher new 04-17cascade olivecommunis junipersemi cascade yewthin cascade yew

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Saving Africa’s only native penguin species

Hermanus Bird Club

Africa’s only native penguin species is inching towards extinction due to local food shortages. Conservationists are now trying to reconnect penguin and prey

African Penguins © Shutterstock
African Penguins © Shutterstock
By Christina Hagen

Penguin: the word elicits images of snowy landscapes, icebergs and tightly huddled groups of penguins bracing the harshest of elements. One penguin species that bucks this cold climate trend is the hardy African Penguin Spheniscus demersus, found only on the south-western tip of Africa, in South Africa and Namibia. This species is adapted to warmer subtropical environments, often having to survive temperatures of over 30° C, likely never to see snow or ice.

The African Penguin population, once numbering in the millions, has been reduced to just 1% of its size in the 1900s. Historical egg collecting between 1900 and 1930 resulted in the removal of a staggering 13 million eggs from southern African islands. At the same time…

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April Meeting – ‘Western Cape Estuaries’

Hermanus Bird Club

Members are reminded that Giselle Murison, Project Manager for the Western Cape Estuaries Conservation Project, will be addressing us on the 19th.  The meeting will start at 18h00 so as to allow extra time to discuss possible affiliation with BirdLife SA.

Western Cape Estuaries Conservation Project

South Africa’s estuaries are one of the country’s most productive habitats. Known for their biodiversity and the important functions they perform, such as providing nursery areas for fish, and feeding and staging areas for significant populations of migratory birds, estuaries constitute one of the country’s most valuable, but vulnerable ecosystems. Many are at risk from multiple threats, including unsustainable land use and unsound land management practices, in part due to their lack of formal protection.Photo 1. Riviera mudflat Berg River Estuary Velddrif

BirdLife South Africa’s Western Cape Estuaries Conservation Project looks to address this gap by seeking formal protection and sustained conservation action for this under-protected ecosystem. Funded by WWF South…

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Japanese seabird conservation

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video says about itself:

14 September 2015

At Hakodate, Japan – After their early morning feeding, these seabirds are grooming their feathers and taking a rest, along that huge motionless breakwater.

From BirdLife:

Japan is home to one third of all seabirds – so we mapped its waters

By Alex Dale, 7 Feb 2017

Japan is known for its densely-populated cities, but some of its most vital areas for bird conservation are places where humans rarely venture – its marine waters.

A nation comprised of a chain of islands, Japan is blessed with a long and rugged coastline, which is home to a particularly high diversity of seabirds within Asia. Nearly a third of all known seabird species venture into Japan’s Exclusive Economic Zone, which stretches 200 nautical miles from its coastline. These species includes all three North Pacific albatrosses, eight auks and eleven petrels and shearwaters

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